Bin the Din 21st September 2017

THURSDAY 21ST SEPTEMBER 2017

R U JOKING, GRANDAD BLOG

&

GRANDAD’S PICTURE of the DAY

BIN THE DIN

I have found to qualify as a grandad I had to lose my hair. Also, my sight has almost had to go, I have become old and eccentric. I also have to fake slow and pretend I cannot operate modern day smart phones, TVs and gadgets. I have to make noises as I stand up or walk up stairs.

 

The biggest thing about being a grandad is the deafness. You do need it to blot out the horrendous din grand children make. But as I have complained about before, I want to ear well in restaurants. I want to thoroughly enjoy the restaurant/pub/coffee shop experience, that means hearing what those who are with me are saying. But usually you can’t because of noise and the acoustics.

 

There are few places I go where I get a wonderful coffe/meal experience and now the charity Action on Hearing back me on this :

 

What a din! High Street chain restaurants have become so noisy that some are louder than lawnmowers

By Sean Poulter Consumer Affairs Editor For The Daily Mail

 

Charity Action on Hearing Loss measured the noise levels in restaurants chains

 

It found levels of around 90dB – the equivalent to eating next to a motorbike

 

The highest figure was in a Patisserie Valerie cafe at a deafening 97.8dB

 

You’d likely have a few words with the maitre d’ if you sat down to a meal and a waiter started up a lawnmower next to you.

 

But that’s the equivalent of what diners are putting up with due to the excessive din at some restaurant chains, a study has found.

 

The situation has become so bad many customers are deciding to get a takeaway rather than put up with the racket. Loud music, which forces people to shout so they can be heard, is turning an evening out into a chore, researchers said.

 

The charity Action on Hearing Loss measured the levels of noise in restaurants chains. It found decibel levels of around 90dB – the equivalent to eating next to a motorbike . And the problem is exacerbated by minimalist decor, such as hard floors and bare walls, which ensure every crash and bang is magnified.

 

The charity Action on Hearing Loss measured the levels of noise in restaurant chains. It found decibel levels of around 90dB – the equivalent to eating next to a motorbike, a lawnmower, a whirring food processor or someone using a hand saw.

 

The highest figure was in a Patisserie Valerie cafe at 97.8dB, while the figure in a Wagamama hit 90.1dB.

The charity says restaurant chains which fail to dampen the noise are their own worst enemies, because it is driving people away. Its research found 91 per cent of people would avoid returning to a noisy place. At the same time, 79 per cent have left a restaurant early due to the clamour.

 

The charity says restaurant chains which fail to dampen the noise are their own worst enemies, because it is driving people away and 43 per cent of potential diners said they were increasingly choosing to stay in for a peaceful takeaway rather than going out.

 

Paul Breckell, the charity’s boss, said: ‘With an increasing variety of takeaway options and the intrusive background noise exacerbated by fashionable hard surfaces, it’s no wonder customers are opting to stay in.’

 

Patisserie Valerie said: ‘All our kitchens are enclosed and we have a policy of no background music in stores. The decibel readings stated appear to have been taken in one store on one specific date and time so cannot give an accurate reflection all stores in our portfolio.’

 

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Take a risk or otherwise you won’t know what you missed. Levi Strauss

HAPPINESS IS…

Happiness is…a great restaurant with superb food and an ambiance where I can hear every word uttered by those I am with.

GRANDAD’S ONE LINER JOKE OF THE DAY

“Oh my goodness, mega drama the other day: My dishwasher stopped working! Yup, his visa expired.” Alexander Henry Buchanan-Dunlop (2014)