BYE, BYE NME PRINT EDITION – WE’LL MISS YOU

BYE, BYE NME PRINT EDITION – WE’LL MISS YOU

rujokinggrandad.co.uk BLOG 10th March 2018

THOUGHTS FOR THE DAY

NME is to cease production of its print edition after 66 years.

 

The magazine’s owners have announced that the free weekly magazine “is no longer financially viable”.

After 66 years of production, the print edition of NME Magazine is to cease publication.

Time Inc. UK, the owners of the British institution, have confirmed that this week’s issue, released on Friday March 9, will be the final ever edition to be released physically. The magazine will continue in a digital format only.

Paul Cheal, Time Inc. UK’s Group Managing Director, Innovation confirmed the sad news, explaining that resources are going into expanding the brand’s digital presence:

“NME is one of the most iconic brands in British media and our move to free print has helped to propel the brand to its biggest ever audience on NME.com. The print re-invention has helped us to attract a range of cover stars that the previous paid-for magazine could only have dreamed of.

“At the same time, we have also faced increasing production costs and a very tough print advertising market. Unfortunately we have now reached a point where the free weekly magazine is no longer financially viable. It is in the digital space where effort and investment will focus to secure a strong future for this famous brand.”

March 7th 2018 marked 66 years since the magazine was first published, on March 7, 1952. The Official Singles Chart was launched in the magazine not long after on November 14, 1952. NME became a free publication following a relaunch in September 2015.

Time Inc. have confirmed that “as part of the new direction, several digital services are launching” including radio channels NME 1 and 2, but in a further statement to Music Week, have revealed that “unfortunately redundancies are planned”.

Earlier this month, NME’s Editor Mike Williams stepped down from his position after more than seven years in the role. Time Inc. UK was also recently sold for £130 million to private equitt company Epiris.

NME (or New Musical Express as it was known then) was the first British paper to include a singles chart, in the edition of November 14, 1952. Did you know the UK singles chart (nowadays the Official Singles Chart) was actually the brainchild of NME Magazine founder Percy Dickins when he needed a method to encourage advertisers to his new music paper?

Dickins compiled the very first charts himself by phoning around to a handful of his retailer friends and totting up the number of copies sold of their biggest sellers to create a simple aggregated chart.

The weekly chart compilation process has most definitely grown in scale and sophistication since, but one thing will remain cemented in history – the Official Chart was born in the pages of the New Musical Express on 14 November 1952 and Al Martino’s Here In My Heart was its first Number 1.

The first cover of the magazine on March 7th 1952 had Jerry Colonna on the front.

The NME circulation peaked with a figure of 306,881 for the period from January to June 1964 and became the best-selling British music newspaper in the 1970s.

During that period it embraced the punk rock revolution and launched the careers of writers including Julie Burchill, Paul Morley and Tony Parsons.

In the mid 1980s, NME was in danger of closing because of a split between those who wanted to write about hip hop, a genre that was relatively new to the UK, and those who wanted to stick to rock music.

It changed from newsprint into a magazine format in 1998.

The website was launched in 1996 and its editor from 2011 to 2013 was Luke Lewis, prior to him launching BuzzFeed in the UK.

 

NME LAST edition 9th March 2018
NME LAST edition 9th March 2018
NME No.1 7th March 1952
NME No.1 7th March 1952

INSPIRATIONAL QUOTE FOR THE DAY

“I bought a train ticket and the driver said ‘Eurostar?’ I said ‘Well, I’ve been on telly but I’m no Dean Martin.’ Still, at least it’s comfortable on Eurostar – it’s murder on the Orient Express.”

HAPPINESS IS…

Happiness is…picking up a copy of the NME and reading it every Friday

GRANDAD’S ONE LINER JOKE OF THE DAY

“I bought a train ticket and the driver said ‘Eurostar?’ I said ‘Well, I’ve been on telly but I’m no Dean Martin.’ Still, at least it’s comfortable on Eurostar – it’s murder on the Orient Express.”

LOVE IS…

Love is…going the extra mile together

TRACK OF THE DAY

Red Light Spells Danger – Billy Ocean

Highest Chart Position: No.2 23rd April 1977