CORONABOBS ISOLATION DAY 87 – Diary of a Self-Isolator 10.6.2020

jeanniejeanniejeannie.co.uk BLOG 12th June 2020

CORONABOBS ISOLATION DAY 87 – Diary of a Self-Isolator Wednesday 10th June 2020

How Much Water Should You Drink Per Day?

The body is about 60% water, give or take.

You are constantly losing water from your body, primarily via urine and sweat. To prevent dehydration, you need to drink adequate amounts of water.

There are many different opinions on how much water you should be drinking every day.

Health authorities commonly recommend eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 litres, or half a gallon. This is called the 8×8 rule and is very easy to remember.

However, some health gurus believe that you need to sip on water constantly throughout the day, even when you’re not thirsty.

As with most things, this depends on the individual. Many factors (both internal and external) ultimately affect your need for water.

This article takes a look at some water intake studies to separate fact from fiction and explains how to easily match water intake to your individual needs.

Does Water Intake Affect Energy Levels and Brain Function?

Many people claim that if you don’t stay hydrated throughout the day, your energy levels and brain function start to suffer.

And there are plenty of studies to support this.

One study in women showed that a fluid loss of 1.36% after exercise impaired mood and concentration and increased the frequency of headaches (1Trusted Source).

Other studies show that mild dehydration (1–3% of body weight) caused by exercise or heat can harm many other aspects of brain function.

Keep in mind that just 1% of body weight is a fairly significant amount. This happens primarily when you’re sweating a lot.

Mild dehydration can also negatively affect physical performance, leading to reduced endurance.

SUMMARY

Mild dehydration caused by exercise or heat can have negative effects on both your physical and mental performance.

Does Drinking a Lot of Water Help You Lose Weight?

There are many claims that increased water intake may reduce body weight by increasing your metabolism and reducing your appetite.

According to two studies, drinking 17 ounces (500 ml) of water can temporarily boost metabolism by 24–30%.

The researchers estimated that drinking 68 ounces (2 litres) in one day increased energy expenditure by about 96 calories per day.

Additionally, it may be beneficial to drink cold water because your body will need to expend more calories to heat the water to body temperature.

Drinking water about a half hour before meals can also reduce the number of calories you end up consuming, especially in older individuals (10Trusted Source, 11Trusted Source).

One study showed that dieters who drank 17 ounces (500 ml) of water before each meal lost 44% more weight over 12 weeks, compared to those who didn’t .

Overall, it seems that drinking adequate amounts of water, particularly before meals, may have a significant weight loss benefit, especially when combined with a healthy diet.

What’s more, adequate water intake has a number of other health benefits.

SUMMARY

Drinking water can cause mild, temporary increases in metabolism, and drinking it about a half hour before each meal can make you automatically eat fewer calories. Both of these effects contribute to weight loss.

Does More Water Help Prevent Health Problems?

Several health problems supposedly respond well to increased water intake:

Constipation: Increasing water intake can help with constipation, a very common problem.

Cancer: Some studies show that those who drink more water have a lower risk of bladder and colorectal cancer, although other studies find no effect.

Kidney stones: Increased water intake may decrease the risk of kidney stones.

Acne and skin hydration: There are a lot of anecdotal reports about how water can help hydrate the skin and reduce acne. So far, no studies have confirmed or refuted this.

SUMMARY

Drinking more water may help with some health problems, such as constipation and kidney stones, but more studies are needed.

Do Other Fluids Count Toward Your Total?

Plain water is not the only drink that contributes to your fluid balance. Other drinks and foods can have a significant effect.

One myth is that caffeinated drinks, such as coffee or tea, don’t help you hydrate because caffeine is a diuretic.

In fact, studies show that the diuretic effect of these beverages is very weak.

Most foods are also loaded with water. Meat, fish, eggs and especially fruits and vegetables all contain significant amounts of water.

For more ideas, check out this article on 19 water-rich foods.

Together, coffee or tea and water-rich foods can help maintain your fluid balance.

SUMMARY

Other beverages can contribute to fluid balance, including coffee and tea. Most foods also contain water.

Trust Your Thirst — It’s There for a Reason

Maintaining water balance is essential for your survival.

For this reason, your body has a sophisticated system for regulating when and how much you drink.

When your total water content goes below a certain level, thirst kicks in.

This is controlled by mechanisms similar to breathing — you don’t need to consciously think about it.

For the majority of people, there probably isn’t any need to worry about water intake. The thirst instinct is very reliable

There really is no science behind the 8×8 rule. It is completely arbitrary.

That said, certain circumstances may call for increased water intake.

The most important one may be during times of increased sweating. This includes exercise and hot weather, especially in a dry climate.

If you’re sweating a lot, make sure to replenish the lost fluid with water. Athletes doing very long, intense exercises may also need to replenish electrolytes along with water.

Your water need also increases during breastfeeding, as well as several disease states like vomiting and diarrhoea.

Furthermore, older people may need to consciously watch their water intake because the thirst mechanisms can start to malfunction in old age (25Trusted Source).

SUMMARY

Most people don’t need to consciously think about their water intake, as the thirst mechanism in the brain is very effective. However, certain circumstances do call for increased attention to water intake.

How Much Water Is Best?

At the end of the day, no one can tell you exactly how much water you need. This depends on the individual.

Try experimenting to see what works best for you. Some people may function better with more water than usual, while for others it only results in more frequent trips to the bathroom.

If you want to keep things simple, these guidelines should apply to the majority of people:

When you’re thirsty, drink.

When you’re not thirsty anymore, stop.

During high heat and exercise, make sure to drink enough to compensate for the lost fluids.

That’s it!

Overhydration

Overhydration, or drinking too much water, is a potentially deadly condition.

7 Ways Your Body Benefits from Lemon Water

Hydration

Vitamin C

Weight loss

Improves skin

Aids digestion

Freshens breath

For kidney stones

How to make

Side effects

Takeaway

Overview

Lemon water is all the rage these days.

Many restaurants serve it routinely, and some people start their day with lemon water instead of coffee or tea. There’s no doubt lemons are delicious, but does adding them to water make you healthier?

Much of the evidence supporting lemon water’s health benefits is anecdotal. Little scientific research has been done specifically on lemon water, but research exists on the benefits of lemon and water separately.

Here are seven ways your body may benefit from lemon water.

 

  1. It promotes hydration

According to the Food and Nutrition Board, general guidelines say that women should get at least 91 ounces per day and men should get at least 125 ounces. This includes water from food and drinks.

Water is the best beverage for hydration, but some people don’t like the taste of it on its own. Adding lemon enhances water’s flavour, which may help you drink more.

 

  1. It’s a good source of vitamin C

Citrus fruits like lemons are high in vitamin C, a primary antioxidant that helps protect cells from damaging free radicals. You’ve probably heard that vitamin C may help prevent or limit the duration of the common cold in some people, but studies are conflicting.

Vitamin C may reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, and lower blood pressure.

 

While lemons don’t top the list of citrus fruits high in vitamin C, they’re still a good source. According to the United States Department of AgricultureTrusted Source, the juice of one lemon provides about 18.6 milligrams of vitamin C. The recommended daily amount for adults is 65 to 90 milligrams.

 

  1. It supports weight loss

Research has shown that polyphenol antioxidants found in lemons significantly reduces weight gain in mice that are overfed in order to induce obesity.

In these mice studies, the antioxidant compounds also offset the negative effects on blood glucose levels and improved insulin resistance, the two main factors in the development of type 2 diabetes.

While the same results need to be proven in humans, anecdotal evidence is strong that lemon water supports weight loss. Whether this is due to people simply drinking more water and feeling full or the lemon juice itself is unclear.

 

  1. It improves your skin quality

Vitamin C found in lemons may help reduce skin wrinkling, dry skin from aging, and damage from the sun. How water improves skin is controversial, but one thing is certain. If your skin loses moisture, it becomes dry and prone to wrinkles. A 2016 laboratory study showed that a citrus-based drink helped prevent the development of wrinkles in hairless mice.

  1. It aids digestion

Some people drink lemon water as a daily morning laxative to help prevent constipation. Drinking warm or hot lemon water when you wake up may help get your digestive system moving.

yurvedic medicine says the sour lemon taste helps stimulate your “agni.” In ayurvedic medicine, a strong agni jump-starts the digestive system, allowing you to digest food more easily and helping to prevent the buildup of toxins.

 

  1. It freshens breath

Have you ever rubbed a lemon on your hands to get rid of the smell of garlic or some other strong odour? The same folk remedy may apply to bad breath caused by eating foods with strong smells such as garlic, onions, or fish.

You might avoid bad breath by drinking a glass of lemon water after meals and first thing in the morning. Lemon is thought to stimulate saliva and water also helps prevent a dry mouth, which can lead to bad breath caused by bacteria.

 

  1. It helps prevent kidney stones

The citric acid in lemons may help prevent kidney stones. Citrate, a component of citric acid, paradoxically makes urine less acidic and may even break up small stones. Drinking lemon water not only gets you citrate, but also the water you need to help prevent or flush out stones.

How to make lemon water

In order to reap any health benefits of lemon water, you need drink it consistently, and you need more than just a single wedge of lemon in your mug.

When making lemon water, always use fresh lemons rather than artificial lemon from a bottle.

To make lemon water, squeeze half a lemon into 8 ounces of warm or cold water. To make the drink as healthy as possible, use filtered water and organic lemons.

Infuse more flavour or add a health boost to lemon water by adding:

a few springs of mint

a teaspoon of maple syrup or raw honey

a slice of fresh ginger

a dash of cinnamon

a sprinkle of turmeric

You can also add slices of other fresh citrus fruits such as limes and oranges, or cucumber slices. Always wash the produce well before slicing and using.

Having lemon ice cubes on hand is a great way to add lemon to your water fast. Simply squeeze fresh lemon juice into ice cube trays and freeze. Drop a few cubes into a glass of cold or hot water as needed.

You can start your morning with a mug of warm lemon water and keep a pitcher of water infused with a few sliced lemons in your refrigerator to drink throughout the day.

Side effects of lemon water

Lemon water is generally safe to drink, but there are a few potential side effects to be aware of.

Lemon contains citric acid, which may erode tooth enamel. To limit the risk, drink lemon water through a straw, and rinse your mouth with plain water afterwards.

When it comes to heartburn, lemon water can go either way. The citric acid may cause heartburn in some people. Others experience relief from heartburn, as lemon juice becomes alkaline, reducing acidity in digestion. Only experimenting can tell its effect on you.

Some people report more frequent trips to the bathroom when drinking lemon water. Although vitamin C is often believed to be a diuretic, something that increases the amount of urine you produce, evidence doesn’t show that vitamin C from natural sources like lemons has diuretic effects.

If you experience the need for extra bathroom breaks while drinking lemon water, it’s more than likely caused by increased water intake.

The takeaway

Research shows lemon water has many potential health benefits. Aside from those, adding lemon to your water may help you drink more throughout the day and keep you hydrated. Staying hydrated is critical to good health.

Drinking pure water for healthy.

Today was a wet day. Just worked on writing all day.

Had morning blood test at the doctors.

My brand new I-pad Pro was delivered. Where did the day go to?

Tried to fix new chair’s incessant creaking and squeaking

Today on the Mount Everest Stairs Challenge I have gone over 10,000feet!

 

DON’T FORGET TO LAUGH EVERYDAY ESPECIALLY WHILST IN ISOLATION

 

INSPIRATIONAL QUOTE FOR THE DAY

Small things sometimes matter the most.

Do small things with great love. — Mother Teresa

HAPPINESS IS…

Happiness is…a cool clear mountain stream of water

GRANDAD’S ONE LINER JOKE OF THE DAY

“What do you call someone with no body and no nose? Nobody knows.”

LOVE IS…

Love is…better than an electric blanket

5 Things To Be Grateful For During Lockdown/Coronavirus

We are GRATEFUL LOCKDOWN gives us a time…

  1. A time to drink only water…A time to drink anything
  2. A time to drink lemon water…A time to drink tea
  3. A time to have a blood test…A time to give the blood tests a miss
  4. A time for time to drag by real slow…A time to wonder where time did go
  5. A time for a chair to creak and squeak…A time for a chair to stay silent.

 

TOTAL STAIRWAY TO EVERST CLIMB CHALLENGE

DAY 67        18 Times – 162 Feet Cumulative Total 10,152 Feet

 

 

 

©2020 Phil M Robinson