DR SEUSS CHILDREN’S AUTHOR & ILLUSTRATOR EXREAORDINAIRE

DR SEUSS CHILDREN’S AUTHOR & ILLUSTRATOR EXREAORDINAIRE

R U JOKING, GRANDAD BLOG 4th October 2017

 Dr. Seuss is one of the greatest and most successful children’s book writers and illustrators.

 

“I look at the world through the wrong end of a telescope.”  & “A person’s a person, no matter how small,” Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. “Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted.”

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of children learn to read.

 

Theodor Seuss Geisel – better known to millions of his fans as Dr. Seuss – was born the son of a brewer and park superintendent in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1904. After studying at Dartmouth College, in New Hampshire, and later at Oxford University in England (where he met his first wife Helen Palmer), he became a magazine humorist and cartoonist and an advertising man. He soon turned his many talents to writing children`s books and his first book ‘And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street’ was published in 1937.

 

His greatest claim to fame was the one and only The Cat in the Hat, published in 1957, the first of a hugely successful range of early learning books collectively known as Beginner Books.

 

His work includes several of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death.

Geisel wrote more than 60 books over the course of his long career. Most were published under his well-known pseudonym Dr. Seuss, though he also authored more than a dozen books as Theo LeSieg and one as Rosetta Stone.

 

His books have topped many bestseller lists, sold over 600 million copies, and been translated into more than 20 languages. In 2000, Publishers Weekly compiled a list of the best-selling children’s books of all time; of the top 100 hardcover books, 16 were written by Geisel, including Green Eggs and Ham, at number 4, The Cat in the Hat, at number 9, and One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, at number 13.

 

In the years after his death in 1991, two additional books were published based on his sketches and notes: Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! and Daisy-Head Mayzie. My Many Colored Days was originally written in 1973 but was posthumously published in 1996. In September 2011, seven stories originally published in magazines during the 1950s were released in a collection entitled The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories.

 

He picked up numerous awards, including two Emmy awards for television and a Pulitzer Prize Special Citation along the way.

 

Geisel also wrote a pair of books for adults: The Seven Lady Godivas (1939; reprinted 1987), a retelling of the Lady Godiva legend that included nude depictions; and You’re Only Old Once! (written in 1986 when Geisel was 82), which chronicles an old man’s journey through a clinic.

 

His last book was Oh, the Places You’ll Go!, which published the year before his death and became a popular gift for graduating students.

Though written in the style of classics such as Green Eggs and Ham and The Cat in the Hat, Oh, the Places You’ll Go! has many specific characters including a narrator and the reader. A young boy, referred to simply as “you”, initiates the action of the story. However, the presence of a main character helps readers to identify with the book. It is written in second person and uses future tense.

 

There is now a Dr Seuss Museum. From the squiggly, pink handrails outside the entrance to the front hall decorated with scenes from “And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street” — a real street just blocks away — the new Amazing World of Dr. Seuss museum says “You’re off to Great Places!”

 

Walking into to the museum in the author and illustrator’s hometown of Springfield, Massachusetts, is like walking into one of his beloved children’s books.

 

The museum dedicated to Theodor Geisel, pen name Dr. Seuss features interactive exhibits, artwork never before displayed publicly and explains how his childhood experiences in the city about 90 miles (145 kilometers) west of Boston shaped his work.

 

 

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Live in the moment. Do you often have a very busy mind? Calm your mind down. Be present. The only time you’re ever living is in this moment. Meditation helps remove mental clutter

HAPPINESS IS…

Happiness is…blowing bubbles

GRANDAD’S ONE LINER JOKE OF THE DAY

Some of us learn from the mistakes of others; the rest of us have to be the others.

LOVE SONG FOR MAMMA

Love To Love – Donna Summer

Highest chart position No.4 – 7th February 1976