PRINGLE TUBE TRIES TO WAKE FROM ‘RECYCLING NIGHTMARE’

PRINGLE TUBE TRIES TO WAKE FROM ‘RECYCLING NIGHTMARE’

jeanniejeanniejeannie.co.uk BLOG Tuesday 15th September 2020

Pringles tube tries to wake from ‘recycling nightmare’

The distinctive Pringles tube is being re-designed after criticism that it’s almost impossible to recycle.

The current container for the potato-based snack was condemned as a recycler’s nightmare.

It’s a complex construction with a metal base, plastic cap, metal tear-off lid, and foil-lined cardboard sleeve.

The Recycling Association dubbed it the number one recycling villain – along with the Lucozade Sports bottle.

Now Pringles’ maker, Kellogg, is trialling a simpler can – although experts say it’s not a full solution.

The existing version is particularly troublesome because it combines so many different materials

Some 90% of the new can is paper. Around 10% is a polyal (plastic) barrier that seals the interior to protect the food against oxygen and moisture which would damage the taste.

But how about the lid? Well, two options are on trial in some Tesco stores – a recyclable plastic lid and a recyclable paper lid. Kellog says these lids will still produce the distinctive “pop” associated with the product.

Simon Ellin from the Recycling Association told BBC News: “The Pringles tube has been a bastion of bad design from the recyclers’ point of view.

“This new version is an improvement, and we broadly welcome it.

“But, frankly, if they are going to stick to a plastic lid that’ll just add to problems with plastic pollution – people on picnics leave them behind and they find their way into streams and the sea. That plastic lid has got to go.”

Kellog says its packaging must be airtight, or the food inside will be wasted.

The new designs have been 12 months in the making. Pringles have a shelf life of 15 months – and three million cans are made across Europe every day.

Mr Ellin said the polyal-coated card might be recyclable but the product would need to be tested in recycling mills.

And what of the much-criticised Lucozade Sports bottle? Mr Ellin said its unchanged basic design was still a big problem, as machines found it hard to differentiate the plastic in the bottle and the plastic that makes up its outer sleeve.

He called on the makers, Suntory, to reduce the size of the external sleeve, as it has with the new Ribena bottle.

The firm said it was planning to do this for the new year.

Suntory said it was working on a new material made entirely from seaweed extract that was 100% edible, biodegradable and compostable.

Environmentalists say that trivial changes like these won’t solve the world’s ecological crises – but on a large scale they’ll make a contribution.

So, lets recycle the carton ourselves. What else could these pesky Pringle tubes be used for?

  1. Pet toys

The used (and clean!) cylinders can be reversioned into toys and food storage for your pets. The owner of two guinea pigs, Franklin and Theodore, makes tunnels for them to play in and stuffs them with hay and treats for the boys to snack on during the day.

A Mumsnet user agrees, and gives the empty tubes to her gerbils. RavenAK said the gerbils loved playing in them and eventually shredded the tubes, so all that was left to do was compost the remains and recycle the metal base.

  1. Vice-provost for education Tanya Stanko used the crisp packaging to create a working Enigma machine with her engineering students at Innopolis University.

The original Enigma machine was used by the Germans during World War Two to encrypt and decrypt messages, but the code was successfully cracked by Alan Turing in 1939.

  1. Carrier bag-holders

After the 5p carrier bag charge was introduced in 2015, hoards of plastic carrier bags have plagued our spare cupboards, but crafty bloggers have reversioned their crisp tubes into bag dispensers.

4.Keeping cables tidy

5. One little boy came up with the idea to make a mini drum kit for the family’s 4 July celebrations, with the addition of a few strips of duct tape to bring it all together.

  1. Christmas decorations

You may still have those Christmas crackers made of cardboard toilet roll tubes and crepe paper from your nursery days. But this creation takes it up a notch.

Jeanette Ellis has made collections from Pringles cans, such as a nativity scene, on and off for years. Her son says they are “always a hit”.

  1. Space rockets

At the Science Museum in London, staff use empty tubes as part of their rocket show. The packaging teamed with hydrogen gas, matches and oxygen creates a reaction to launch the rockets, which – apparently – makes “quite a loud bang”.

 

The rockets don’t quite have enough power to reach space

 

8. Alternative Crossrail

Meanwhile, in 2015 railway blogger Andy Carter calculated how many Pringles you could fit into the 26-mile rail tunnel project, Crossrail. Services – when work is complete – will run as far west as Reading, in Berkshire and as far east as Shenfield, in Essex.

Mr Carter made a number of rough calculations and claims it would take a whopping 844 million cans of Pringles to fill Crossrail.

But I doubt you’d try this one at home.

DON’T FORGET TO LAUGH EVERYDAY

 

INSPIRATIONAL QUOTE FOR THE DAY

“Grudges are a waste of perfect happiness. Laugh when you can. Apologize when you should and let go of what you can’t change.”

— Drake

HAPPINESS IS…

Happiness is…a tube of Pringles

GRANDAD’S ONE LINER JOKE OF THE DAY

I manufactured clown shoes… no small feat.

LOVE IS…

Love is…a picture of happiness.

WHAT IS THERE A SEASON FOR TODAY TURN, TURN, TURN …

A time for Walkers Crisps…A time for Pringles.

SOMETHING TO BE POSITIVE ABOUT & GRATEFUL FOR IN THE WORLD

The night sky filled with the moon and a thousand twinkling stars.

SOMETHING TO LAUGH ABOUT

TOMMY COOPER

Thomas Frederick Cooper (19 March 1921 – 15 April 1984) was a British prop comedian and magician. As an entertainer, his appearance was large and lumbering at 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m), and he habitually wore a red fez when performing. He initially served in the British Army for seven years, before eventually developing his conjuring skills and becoming a member of the The Magic Circle. Although he spent time on tour performing his magical act, which specialised on magic tricks that appeared to “fail”, he rose to international prominence when his career moved into television, with programmes for London Weekend Television and Thames Television. He also made a brilliant record, “Don’t Jump Off The Roof Dad”.

 

By the end of the 1970s, Cooper slipped into heavy smoking and drinking, which affected his career and his health, effectively ending offers to front new programmes and regulating him as a guest star on other entertainment shows. Ill health eventually claimed his life when, on 15 April 1984, Cooper died of a heart attack live on television.

TOTAL STAIRWAY TO EVEREST CLIMB CHALLENGE

Monday 14/9/2020 DAY 163        16 Times – 144 Feet     Cumulative Total 24,291 Feet

 

 

 

 

©2020 Phil M Robinson